What can market researchers learn from Hokusai and the Great Wave?

Hokusai's The Great Wave

The Great Wave off Kanagawa

To read the Japanese version of this post (from Mr Ryota Sano) click here.

Many of us from outside Japan are familiar with Hokusai’s picture the Great Wave, but I suspect that I am not alone in being less familiar with his other works. Luckily for me, that situation changed today. In learning more about Hokusai, I was struck by its significance for market researchers, insight professionals, and anybody looking for the story in the data.

I spent the afternoon attending an exhibition of Hokusai’s work. The exhibition showed Hokusai’s work and highlighted the enormous impact he had on painters such as Monet, Gauguin and Pissarro.

I won’t go into all of the many things that I learned today, instead I will focus on a few lessons for those of us trying to find meaning in data and information.

Hokusai's 'Rainstorm Beneath the Summit'

Rainstorm Beneath the Summit

One of Hokusai’s great works is his 36 views of Mount Fuji. The great wave is one of the 36 views, as are the other two on this page. In the West, at the time Hokusai was becoming famous (the mid-19th Century), painters rarely painted the same scene repeatedly. In contrast Hokusai did one hundred black and white views of Mount Fuji in one series, and in a colour series did 36 views. This re-visiting the same scene repeatedly was one of several elements that the impressionists picked up on, for example Monet and the 20 years he spent painting water lilies at Giverny.

But, and this is the key for insight professionals, Hokusai did not keep doing the same thing, he found multiple views of the subject. In the second picture on this page, Mount Fuji dominates the scene, in the third picture the trees and people in the foreground are the key element, and, of course, in the top picture
all the focus is on the wave, with Mount Fuji barely noticeable.

Hokusai painting

Hodogaya on the Tōkaidō

The exhibition illustrated the way that Hokusai developed his skills. There were endless sketchbooks on the topic of waves, where his ability to capture the essence of waves was honed. This enabled the Great Wave to be so impactful. To make good stories, you need good skills.

So, the lesson for insight professionals are:

  1. Look for alternative views, don’t stop with the first nice story you find. Remember to match the story to the problem, sometimes the mountain is not the story, even when it is the biggest thing around.
  2. Don’t feel you have to follow all the rules, Hokusai’s paintings do not follow Western notions of perspective, they are about communicating truth, not accuracy.
  3. Don’t throw the whole colour palette at the problem. Hokusai often used relatively few colours, few lines, and often left sections of the canvas blank. In market research terms, don’t think the story needs all of the questions from the survey, and does not need every analysis running.
  4. Remember Hokusai practiced and developed his skills, so that he could tell his stories in what looked like an effortless way. Market researchers need to build their storytelling skills on the foundation of good analytic skills.
  5. The stories work at an emotional level, they are not photographs, they are the result of removing the unnecessary, and simplifying the elements, to convey a message. In research stories too, we need to remove the unnecessary, simplify the elements, and convey the story at an emotional level.

 

PS, the images are from Wikipedia, who feels that these versions are in the public domain, unlike the ones I bought today at the exhibition, which probably aren’t.


Japanese version contributed by Mr Ryota Sano, from TALKEYE Inc., Japan.

マーケティングリサーチャーが北斎と「グレートウェーブ」から学ぶべきこと

Hokusai's The Great Wave

神奈川沖浪裏

たとえあなたが日本人でなくても、北斎の版画「グレートウェーブ」(原題「神奈川沖浪裏」)のことは知っているだろう。しかし、北斎の他の作品となるといささか心許ないのではないだろうか。私も今日まではその一人であった。幸いにも今日、北斎の他の作品に触れる機会を得て、彼の作品がマーケティングリサーチャー、インサイトプロフェッショナル、そしてデータの中にストーリーを見つけようとしているすべての人間にとって大きな示唆を与えてくれることに気づいた。

今日の午後、私は北斎の展覧会(訳注:「北斎とジャポニズム−HOKUSAIが西洋に与えた衝撃」)に行った。この展覧会は、北斎の数々の作品と、それらが西洋の著名な画家、モネ、ゴーガン、ピサロに与えた影響に焦点を当てている。

今日私が学んだ多くのことすべてについてここで書くつもりはないが、代わりにデータや情報になんらかの意味を見つけようとしているすべての人にいくつかの教訓を送りたい。

Hokusai's 'Rainstorm Beneath the Summit'

山下白雨

北斎の偉大な業績の一つに「富嶽三十六景」という富士山を描いた36の作品群がある。「グレートウェーブ」は三十六景の一つであるが、その他の二つの作品をここで取りあげたい。西洋社会で北斎が有名になった19世紀半ば、(西洋の)画家達は同じ景色を繰り返し描くことはしなかった。対照的に、北斎は一連の作品として白黒の富士山を百枚描き、カラーの富士山を36枚描いている。同じ題材について何枚も描くこと、それが印象派の画家達の大きな特徴の一つである。例えば、モネはジヴェルニーでの20年間、繰り返し睡蓮の画を描いている。

ここでインサイトプロフェッショナルにとって重要なのは、北斎はただ同じことを繰り返していたわけではない、ということである。北斎は同じ主題について異なる複数の観点を持っていた。このページの二つ目の絵を見てもらいたい。富士山が大きく描かれている。三つ目の絵では、手前に描かれている木々と人々が重要な要素となっている。最初の絵では、大波に焦点が当てられていて、富士山はその向こうにかすかに見える程度にすぎない。

Hokusai painting

東海道程ケ谷

展覧会では北斎がどのようにして技術を磨いたのかを紹介していた。波を題材にしたスケッチブックは何冊にも及び、波の本質を描く技術を彼がどのように磨いたのかがよくわかった。この努力の積み重ねが「グレートウェーブ」を偉大な作品たらしめたのである。よいストーリーを産み出すためには、よいスキルセットが必要なのだ。

私が、インサイトプロフェッショナルに送りたい教訓は以下のとおりである。

(1)最初に思いついた、ちょっといいストーリーで満足せず、異なった観点を追い求めろ。問題にストーリーを当てはめることを忘れるな。場合によっては、「山」は主人公ではない。たとえそれが一番大きな存在だとしても。
(2)すべてのルールに従う必要はない。北斎の版画は西洋的な透視図法を採用していないが、彼の絵は、たとえ見た目の正確さを欠いていても、真実を伝えている。
(3)「色」を使いすぎるな。北斎はあまり多くの色を使わない。さらに、描く線も最小限で、紙のあちこちが白いままである。マーケティングリサーチに置き換えれば、ストーリーに調査におけるすべての質問を反映させる必要はない。すべての解析結果を盛り込む必要もない。
(4)北斎が常に練習を繰り返して、技術を磨いていたことを覚えておくべきである。彼はたゆまぬ努力の結果として、やすやすと素晴らしい絵を描けたのだ。マーケティングリサーチャーは、適切な分析スキルの基礎の上に立って、よいストーリーを語れるように努力すべきだろう。
(5)ストーリーは人々の感情レベルにおいて作用する。ストーリーは写真ではなく、不必要なものをそぎ落とした後に残る、簡にして要を得たメッセージを伝えるものでなければならない。繰り返しになるが、マーケティングリサーチの文脈においても、不必要な要素を排し、要素を厳選し、腑に落ちるストーリーを語る必要がある。

版画はすべてウィキペディアからの引用である。

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *