Ray Poynter working in Cafe

The Difference Between Customer Focused and Customer Centricity?

To read the Japanese version of this post (from Mr Ryota Sano) click here. Posted by Ray Poynter, 6 April 2018 Last week I was asked about the difference between customer focused and customer centric. For many people, these two terms are almost interchangeable, but if you dig into the literature and advice there are some subtle but important differences. This post looks at the differences between customer focused and customer centricity – and identifies where customer centricity is taking centre stage. The trend in customer centricity, compared with customer focused, is illustrated by the data from Google Trends shown below. The key change to keep in mind is that markets have moved from product centricity to customer centricity. Companies used to focus on design, on manufacturing, and logistics. In the days when products and services could achieve a clear product/service difference that was clear, sustainable, and beneficial – a product-centric approach made sense. Today, we have informed consumers, competitive markets, and few tangible product/service benefits – which has resulted in the focus shifting to customers. So, what is the difference in customer centricity and customer focused, and why might you favour customer centricity? Here are my five key differences. 1 […]

Ben Blatt's book

Nabokov’s Favourite Word is Mauve – a book market researchers should read

To read the Japanese version of this post (from Mr Ryota Sano) click here. Post by Ray Poynter, 28 March 2018 Ben Blatt’s book, Nabokov’s Favourite Word Is Mauve is a good read, and a read I would recommend to any market researcher who wanted to widen his or her horizons in ways that challenged their ‘within-the-box thinking’. The book is, on the face of it, a quantitative review of different characteristics of literature. But do not panic, Blatt’s work does not reduce great literature to a set of soulless and unfeeling numbers. The success of the book is that it makes the reader think about authors like Hemingway and Austen, Rowling and Joyce in new and interesting ways. The book explores several characteristics of writing to provide additional perspectives on things we already know. For example, Blatt devotes his first chapter to exploring whether the advice to use adverbs sparingly is supported by success or otherwise of authors and books. In his analysis, he quickly homes in on ‘ly’ adverbs, such as ‘suddenly’ and ‘quickly’. He starts his analysis by looking at a list of successful authors and contrasting their use of adverbs, for example Ernest Hemmingway and Mark Twain […]

Image of Survey

Call for Collaboration – Training Benchmark Survey 2018

Updated 2 FebrMarch, 2018 Sue York and Ray Poynter are heading a collaborative effort to learn more about the current state of play with respect to training in the market research and insights industry, with a view to making recommendations for improvements. This study builds on the learning we achieved late last year with our Knowledge Benchmarking study (read more about that study by clicking here). We invite anybody who is interested to join this collaboration, and some of those who have already indicated support are shown below – more will be added when we clarify whether they want publicity or not. What sort of help are we looking for:  Suggesting improvements to the questionnaire. [Completed]  Helping translate the questionnaire. We already have some offers of help – but we would like more languages and more help. Helping maximise the response to the survey. We want to ensure that we get a large enough sample so that we can analyse the results by country, by role (e.g. client-side versus agency), and by years in the industry. Helping with the open-ended responses (especially those not in English). Help with reviewing the analysis, recommendations and commentary. Timeline The timeline is subject to collective […]

Clapper Board with Building a Personal Brand as its message

Hints for Building a Personal Brand

To read the Japanese version of this post (from Mr Ryota Sano) click here. Post by Ray Poynter, 31 January 2018 On Friday, 9 February 2018, Sue York and I are presented a webinar on how to build a personal brand in the market research and insights space, click here to find out more. In the run-up to this webinar I posted a series of tips (on LinkedIn) for people wanting to develop a brand. This post is the collection of posts and some news about a course that Sue York and I are running on this topic. Hint 1 – Research Your Field Before you start creating a brand it is important to understand what other people are doing. For this hint I am simply going to point you to a great post by a new face Ella Beaumont, showing how she systematically researched the MR scene and set about creating her plan. Hint 2 – Be positive and supportive Most people who have created a successful personal brand in the market research space are almost all positive and supportive people, people like Leonard Murphy and Kristin Luck. In the F2F world, make a positive comment when something is […]

Image of woman and brain

How to pick a market research approach?

To read the Japanese version of this post (from Mr Ryota Sano) click here. For most business needs there are several good ways to find a market research approach. The table below sets out some thoughts about the most widely used techniques for four categories of business needs. 1 How many X do Y? Within this heading I am including product/service usage and attitude mapping, customer satisfaction, and ad tracking and awareness. The key need is to quantify things so that they can be managed. For example, quantitative ad tracking allows the buyers of advertising to measure the effectiveness of their expenditure, at least in terms of the number of people reached, the number recalling advertising, and measures such as brand recall and stated purchase intention. There are two key MR techniques: Surveys Passive / Big Data (including social media) 2 Reactions To & Predictions About a New Y or New Marketing for Y? This heading relates to testing new products, new advertising, new marketing etc. The needs range from understanding how people interpret and react to a new product through to predictions about future sales. There are a wide range of MR techniques available for this category of needs: […]

Hokusai's The Great Wave

What can market researchers learn from Hokusai and the Great Wave?

To read the Japanese version of this post (from Mr Ryota Sano) click here. Many of us from outside Japan are familiar with Hokusai’s picture the Great Wave, but I suspect that I am not alone in being less familiar with his other works. Luckily for me, that situation changed today. In learning more about Hokusai, I was struck by its significance for market researchers, insight professionals, and anybody looking for the story in the data. I spent the afternoon attending an exhibition of Hokusai’s work. The exhibition showed Hokusai’s work and highlighted the enormous impact he had on painters such as Monet, Gauguin and Pissarro. I won’t go into all of the many things that I learned today, instead I will focus on a few lessons for those of us trying to find meaning in data and information. One of Hokusai’s great works is his 36 views of Mount Fuji. The great wave is one of the 36 views, as are the other two on this page. In the West, at the time Hokusai was becoming famous (the mid-19th Century), painters rarely painted the same scene repeatedly. In contrast Hokusai did one hundred black and white views of Mount […]