How many of your Twitter followers are fake?

Have you ever stopped to wonder how many of your Twitter followers are fake? Or, more importantly, when you or your client are buying endorsements from somebody with a mega number of followers, are they real. Or, if you are trying measure influence, what figure should you attribute somebody with? Back in November of last year, StatusPeople.com did an analysis of Katie Perry and come up with an estimate that 42% of her followers were fake, 36% were inactive, and 22% were good. Of course with nearly 50 million followers, even 22% good produces quite a few people. For the loss of a small amount of privacy (you have to sign in with your Twitter account), you can check your own ratio of fake followers with StatusPeople – my score showed that I had 5% fake followers. So, you can get fake followers without having to buy them.</p? You can also find out more about your followers, or somebody else’s follower using SocialBakers’ FakeFollowers (they had me at 6% fake, but 90% active) – again you have to sign in with your Twitter account. But, as Chereen Zaki posting on Forbes pointed out, back in March, buying followers could cost […]

Does using the #MRX tag limit the conversation?

Most market researchers (IMO) who use Twitter do so with the #MRX tag, with the #NewMR, #ESOMAR and #AMSRS tags a little way behind. Indeed Vaughan Mordecai has recently posted an interesting analysis of #MRX contributor and content – and Jeffrey Henning Tweets a weekly list of top #MRX links and posts a biweekly blog on GreenBook about the top ten. But, is all of this just creating a cozy world where a few thousand market researchers tweet to each other, and nobody else really contributes, reads, are even cares? The quickest way to get recognition amongst market researchers is to use the #MRX tag, so it becomes the default, and in doing so, perhaps, it becomes a fence or boundary of our own making? Time add new links to the wider world? Other leading #MRX figures, such as Tom Ewing and Reg Baker have written about what happens if you ignore the #MRX audience, your figures quickly decline. But perhaps the key is to be adding more dimensions to what we do, and for those dimensions to have an external focus? By external focus, I mean using cues and clues that other people are likely to be looking for. […]

Facebook still dominant in the UK – even amongst the young!

Every week we seem to get a new report saying that Twitter, or Pinterest, or instant chat apps have knocked Facebook off its perch as the number one social media platform in the West, especially amongst younger people. One day this will be true, but not this year, nor next, nor (probably) the year after. In partnership with Vision Critical’s Springboard omnibus I have re-run a study we first ran in August 2012, looking at social media usage, and focusing on regular social media usage. The data show two big messages: Facebook dwarfs other social media. The pace of change between 2012 and 2013 is glacially slow. Table 1 shows how many people said that they had used each of the listed forms of social media in the last year. The Vision Critical Springboard omnibus is broadly representative of Great Britain, but since it is an online survey, the figures for social media exclude the (approximately) 15% of Britons who do not use the internet. Table 1 shows that in terms of social media used in the last year, in the UK, there was very little change between 2012 and 2013, other than a drop in the claimed usage of […]