Evette Cordy Book

Cultivating Curiosity by Evette Cordy, a book worth reading

Posted by Ray Poynter, 19 April 2018 On the flight back from Australia to the UK, I read Evette Cordy’s new book Curating Curiosity: How to unearth your most valuable problem to inspire growth. I definitely recommend this book to anybody who wants to solve problems, help clients, grow their role at work, and/or get more stuff done. I do have some quibbles with a few of the observations and recommendations, but between the quibbles, there are large slabs of really useful pages, which provide a mix of broad philosophy and detailed suggestions for improving the way you work. The main thrust of the book (in my eyes) relates to the need to properly identify problems. For example, ensuring that you are actually tackling the main/underlying problem, that you have properly understood what is needed, and you have correctly assessed the context. The book identifies several problems, with the two key ones being: Starting the process by looking for solutions – which prevents time being spent on problem finding. Assuming things – for example assuming that we know what customers need, or that the solution has to be A or B (when maybe it could be C, or A&B, or […]

Alan Frost

Tribute to Alan Frost – a Market Research Pioneer

This article is by way of an acknowledgement of the pioneering work undertaken by Alan Frost in the field of market research. His work was undertaken before the days of the internet so we would like to take this opportunity to give Alan the recognition he deserves. This article has four authors, Ray Poynter, Elaine Bowyer, Michael Davis and Graham Croome (and special thanks to Graham for organising this tribute). Ray Poynter This article is to highlight and remember a great innovator, who because his time was before the internet, runs the risk of being unjustly forgotten. Alan Frost studied psychology at Liverpool University in the late 50’s and realised that the great leaps that were being made in psychology could be applied commercially in the rapidly expanding world of market research. From the outset Alan was an innovator, applying Kelly repertory grids, cluster analysis (accessing shared time on bureaux offering computer mainframe access), and gamification approaches to attribute elicitation. I started working with Alan Frost in 1978, when he became one of the first in the UK to buy and use an Apple II computer – I continued working with Alan until he retired due to ill heath in […]

Ray Poynter working in Cafe

The Difference Between Customer Focused and Customer Centricity?

To read the Japanese version of this post (from Mr Ryota Sano) click here. Posted by Ray Poynter, 6 April 2018 Last week I was asked about the difference between customer focused and customer centric. For many people, these two terms are almost interchangeable, but if you dig into the literature and advice there are some subtle but important differences. This post looks at the differences between customer focused and customer centricity – and identifies where customer centricity is taking centre stage. The trend in customer centricity, compared with customer focused, is illustrated by the data from Google Trends shown below. The key change to keep in mind is that markets have moved from product centricity to customer centricity. Companies used to focus on design, on manufacturing, and logistics. In the days when products and services could achieve a clear product/service difference that was clear, sustainable, and beneficial – a product-centric approach made sense. Today, we have informed consumers, competitive markets, and few tangible product/service benefits – which has resulted in the focus shifting to customers. So, what is the difference in customer centricity and customer focused, and why might you favour customer centricity? Here are my five key differences. 1 […]

Chart of device usage

Useful summary of mobile device usage in the USA

Posted by Ray Poynter, 3 April 2018 A recent Pew Report (Mobile Fact Sheet – 5 February, 2018) shared some great data on the devices the US population are using. The topline numbers show that by early 2018, 95% of the US population had a mobile phone, with nearly 80% of the population having a smartphone. The chart below was created by using data from two sections of the report and combining them (if you click on it you will see a larger version). Several key trends are clear and important. Mobile phones are ubiquitous – nearly everybody has one. Smartphones are really common, but over one-fifth of the population does NOT have one. The ownership and use of desktop/laptop computers has plateaued at about 70-75%. Tablets are still growing, and may overtake desktop/laptop computers soon. E-readers seem to be stuck at 20% of the population – and perhaps that will fall when the ones currently in use break? Digging into the data The report from Pew has some great nuggets relating to differences by groups. For example, smartphone ownership amongst the over 65 year olds is less than 50% (46%). Ownership of smartphones is over 90% for the under […]