International Women's Day

Celebrating International Women’s Day 2018 with NewMR & WIRe

Post by Sue York, 2 March, 2018 NewMR & Women in Research (WIRe) & Annie Pettit (@LoveStats) are joining forces in 2018 to promote the celebration of International Women’s Day on 8 March. Inspired by the International Women’s Day theme #PressforProgress – NewMR and WIRe are launching a joint campaign to celebrate the contributions and achievements of women in market research and insights. We would like to highlight those who are pressing for progress either by championing the cause of gender parity in research or through the efforts and achievements of women. We hope that the campaign shines a light on all women who are pressing for progress in their own ways, particularly those whose efforts are not in the public eye. So, on International Women’s Day we are asking you to think about the women you know who make the market research and insights industry a better place through their contributions and efforts. Tag a colleague, client, friend or connection who you think deserves recognition on Twitter (and remember to add #NewMR, #mrx, #PressforProgress, #WIREHeroes) on 8 March and let’s celebrate together what we do each and every day and how great that is!

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Blockchain and Market Research – A force for disruption soon?

Post by Ray Poynter, 3 March 2018 Have you noticed that there seems to a lot of people who are shouting about how important blockchain (and or cryptocurrencies like Bitcoin) are going to be for market research? In November 2017 a Quirks article claimed “blockchain is turning marketing research on its head” and at IIeX Europe Rolfe Swinton and Snorri Gudmundsson presented “10 Reasons Why Blockchain is a Big Deal for MR – And What You Can do About it”. Although I am a fan of technology, I am a sceptical fan, and all the buzz about blockchain stimulated both my interest and my scepticism, so I set about finding out more about blockchain and issues such as cryptocurrencies (like Bitcoin) and smart contracts (such as those created using Solidity and Ethereum). Whilst I can’t be 100% sure, my gut feel is that blockchain will not disrupt market research within the next five years (and maybe never), and here is my line of thinking. Of course, I could be wrong 🙂 What is blockchain? Blockchain is the technology that underpins Bitcoin. Indeed, in 2008 blockchain was Bitcoin, and Bitcoin was blockchain – but now there are other blockchains, some with […]

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Are you a collaborative and productive worker? Does your employer know that? Are you sure?

To read the Japanese version of this post (from Mr Ryota Sano) click here. Post by Ray Poynter, 21 February 2018 I have just been reading an interesting HBR article (Rob Cross et el, Collaborative Overload, first published in 2016) that I think highlights the need for people in organisations to develop a personal brand – especially if they are amongst the most productive and collaborative people in their organisation. The paper reports on studies that looked at collaboration inside organisations and found that, on average, 20-to-35% of the value added by collaborations came from just 3-to-5% of employees. These productive people were the ones who were able to offer one or more of the following: Informational resources, knowledge that can be passed on to other to use. Social resources, knowing who to refer a problem or query to. Personal resources, including time and energy – this is the most draining of the three. The researchers reviewed about 300 organisations, using a variety of tools to map collaboration and value added. The studies found that at least 50% of the people who were most valuable to the organisation were not known to be so important by senior management. Think about […]

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Call for Collaboration – Training Benchmark Survey 2018

Updated 2 FebrMarch, 2018 Sue York and Ray Poynter are heading a collaborative effort to learn more about the current state of play with respect to training in the market research and insights industry, with a view to making recommendations for improvements. This study builds on the learning we achieved late last year with our Knowledge Benchmarking study (read more about that study by clicking here). We invite anybody who is interested to join this collaboration, and some of those who have already indicated support are shown below – more will be added when we clarify whether they want publicity or not. What sort of help are we looking for:  Suggesting improvements to the questionnaire. [Completed]  Helping translate the questionnaire. We already have some offers of help – but we would like more languages and more help. Helping maximise the response to the survey. We want to ensure that we get a large enough sample so that we can analyse the results by country, by role (e.g. client-side versus agency), and by years in the industry. Helping with the open-ended responses (especially those not in English). Help with reviewing the analysis, recommendations and commentary. Timeline The timeline is subject to collective […]

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Hints for Building a Personal Brand

To read the Japanese version of this post (from Mr Ryota Sano) click here. Post by Ray Poynter, 31 January 2018 On Friday, 9 February 2018, Sue York and I are presented a webinar on how to build a personal brand in the market research and insights space, click here to find out more. In the run-up to this webinar I posted a series of tips (on LinkedIn) for people wanting to develop a brand. This post is the collection of posts and some news about a course that Sue York and I are running on this topic. Hint 1 – Research Your Field Before you start creating a brand it is important to understand what other people are doing. For this hint I am simply going to point you to a great post by a new face Ella Beaumont, showing how she systematically researched the MR scene and set about creating her plan. Hint 2 – Be positive and supportive Most people who have created a successful personal brand in the market research space are almost all positive and supportive people, people like Leonard Murphy and Kristin Luck. In the F2F world, make a positive comment when something is […]

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We Love Starting a Conversation

Post by Sue York, 27 January, 2018 At NewMR we love starting a research conversation – that’s one of our main reasons for being – to encourage researchers to think and talk about research and how to move our methods, approaches and practices forward to better embrace the future. So I was delighted to see this follow up to our November New, But Not Tech! event (click here if you would like to listen to the presentation that sparked this follow up conversation or the rest of the event). What started the conversation? In our New! But Not Tech event Sue Bell was interviewed by Suzanne Burdon on “Sense-making – a challenge to behavioural insights” (click here to listen to the recording) and in the Q & A session following the presentation a question was asked – Is sense making an ethnographic technique? Sue and Charlie Cochrane continued their conversation on this after the event and Sue has kindly summarised the exchange on her blog http://www.sbresearch.com.au/index.php/bellbird/139-revisiting-ethnography-a-conversation-between-sue-bell-and-charlie-cochrane Thanks for sharing Sue and Charlie!

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How to pick a market research approach?

To read the Japanese version of this post (from Mr Ryota Sano) click here. For most business needs there are several good ways to find a market research approach. The table below sets out some thoughts about the most widely used techniques for four categories of business needs. 1 How many X do Y? Within this heading I am including product/service usage and attitude mapping, customer satisfaction, and ad tracking and awareness. The key need is to quantify things so that they can be managed. For example, quantitative ad tracking allows the buyers of advertising to measure the effectiveness of their expenditure, at least in terms of the number of people reached, the number recalling advertising, and measures such as brand recall and stated purchase intention. There are two key MR techniques: Surveys Passive / Big Data (including social media) 2 Reactions To & Predictions About a New Y or New Marketing for Y? This heading relates to testing new products, new advertising, new marketing etc. The needs range from understanding how people interpret and react to a new product through to predictions about future sales. There are a wide range of MR techniques available for this category of needs: […]

Things you need to know 1

To lose one may be regarded as a misfortune, to lose two looks like carelessness!

‘To lose one may be regarded as a misfortune, to lose two looks like carelessness.’ From time to time, you will hear this useful phrase. Here are some notes about what it means, where it comes from, and key facts about Oscar Wilde (the originator of the phrase). Where does it come from? The original quote comes from a play, ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’, written by Irish poet, author and playwright Oscar Wilde (1854 – 1900). The quote in the play is spoken by Lady Bracknell, “‘To lose one parent, Mr Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness.” What does it mean? The statement implies there is something wrong with the person being spoken about. For example, ‘To lose one CFO is unlucky, to lose two looks like a pattern.’ The device shifts the focus away from the event (for example a CFO leaving) and moves it to the person being ‘judged’. The tone of the comment sounds humorous, but the intent is quite sharp. The speaker is saying there is probably something deficient with the person/company being spoken about. The term is similar to ‘There is no smoke without fire.’, but it […]

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Market Research Knowledge Benchmarking Study 2017

In November 2017 Ray Poynter and Sue York conducted a study into Market Research Knowlege and produced a report. This post reproduces the Executive Summary and the start of the main section. At the bottom of this post, we will tell you how you can download the whole report. Executive Summary This report looks at the state of market research knowledge and the factors associated with higher levels of knowledge. The authors believe that skills are going to be a key driver of the future success the market research and insights profession. The study supports our view that there are specific initiatives (such as attending webinars) that are associated with higher knowledge levels. This report covers a study conducted globally (in English and Japanese) in November 2017, with 730 market researchers and insight professionals. Key Findings People differ in terms of how many market research terms they are familiar with (i.e. able to explain to somebody else). This is not surprising, but it reminds us that when data is presented or reported there will be variations in the knowledge levels of the audience. Nearly 40% of this sample did not attend a single training session or workshop in 2017. The […]

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Hints for Presenting at International Conference

Earlier this week I attended the IIeX APAC Conference in Thailand and it was a fantastic event – I strongly recommend it for next year. Although most of the presentations were great, there were occasional reminders about things that presenters need to be aware of when presenting at conferences, and in particular at international events. Make your first couple of sentences clear, welcoming, and redundant. When you first start to speak, the audience needs to tune in to your voice, to assess your speed and volume, and get used to your accent. If you have a truly international audience, there is a good chance that 50% of the room will not really understand your first couple of sentences – that is why they should be redundant. For example, I might start a presentation about the ESOMAR Pricing Study with something like “Good morning, my name is Ray Poynter, and I am based in the UK. Today, I am going to be exciting you with five important messages from the ESOMAR Pricing Study”. This sets the tone, is polite, is redundant, and allows the audience to tune in to my voice and pronunciation. Avoid words, examples and metaphors that might be […]