Joaquim Bretcha and Finn Raben

ESOMAR APAC Conference – the rise of China

Posted by Ray Poynter, 28 May Last week’s ESOMAR APAC Conference in Macau was an amazing success with about 300 attendees and there is lots to report back, but I will start with the big message, China is shaping up to be one of the biggest forces in market research over the next few years. Indeed, at the end of my presentation on global research I made the prediction that over the next five years the MR turnover in China would double, making it the third largest market for MR, after USA and UK and ahead of Germany and France. The Rise of China and MROver the last decade, the Chinese economy has grown but it has also matured. As the market matures it becomes ever harder to sell products and services and marketing becomes ever more important, and all that competition and marketing leads to a demand for more market research. Globally one of the big changes in MR is the increase of non-traditional research, which mostly means digital research. In 2013 this non-traditional research accounted for 39% of all research spend, by 2017 this had increased to 46% and soon (perhaps already) 50% of every research dollar will […]

ESOMAR Council

ESOMAR Council January 2019

January saw the first full meeting of the new ESOMAR Council, led by the new President Joaquim Bretcha. Here is an outline of what discussed and what we are going to do next.

AMSRS Conference 2018

The excitement of the new and the best of the old – AMSRS Annual Conference 2018

Posted by Ray Poynter 16 August 2018 Last week I had the honour to attend the Australian AMSRS Annual Conference in Melbourne, and once again it was a great event, leaving my head full of new ideas, and my batteries re-charged with a love for market research and insights. The success of the AMSRS conference was built on four key pillars: The people, starting with Leslea Clements and Elissa Molloy, extending to the wider AMSRS team (staff, board members, volunteers etc), and the programme committee. The excitement of the new, in particular the way the invited speakers made a point of pushing the boundaries of what we mean by market research and asking questions about where next? The best of the old, AMSRS makes plenty of space available in its programme for social research, methodology papers, case studies, and initiatives such as the better surveys project – ensuring that the core skills and assets of market research are retained and enhanced. The social side, AMSRS dinners are legendary, blending a great chance to meet people and simple, unadulterated fun. For me the key highlights were: WIRE – Women in Research. On the evening before the conference proper WIRE organised an […]

Front cover of Skills and Training Report

Market Research Skills and Training Study 2018 Report

Posted by Ray Poynter Sue York, 8 August 2018 Below is the Executive Summary of our Market Research Skills and Training Study 2018 Report. You can download the full report by clicking here. Executive Summary Market research is a knowledge-based industry, its key asset is people – software comes and goes, techniques evolve, but if the future of market research is to be secured, it will be on the strength of its people to add value, and importantly, to add value that non-researchers cannot. To ensure that value-added future, market research needs to develop its people, and a key part of that process in training, to build the competence of the people who make up the research industry. However, this report suggests that too little training is happening. The authors believe that if market research and the insights profession is to prosper in the upcoming world of big data, automation, and artificial intelligence, this must change, and we will outline some of the key steps needed to achieve that. This report is based on a study conducted globally in April to June 2018, with 1108 market researchers and insight professionals, and builds on our Market Research Knowledge Benchmarking Study 2017. […]

Training Survey 2018

A 2018 benchmark for training in the market research and insights industry

The NewMR survey closed on 31 May and the data is currently being processed. The future of the market research and insights industry is dependent on our ability to add value to data. The digital revolution (including the rise of passive data, automation, and more recently AI) means that data is plentiful and every month it becomes cheaper and ever more plentiful. If market research and insights are to prosper, it will be because we can add something that the machines can’t, for example, design skills, qualitative insights, presenting flair, storytelling, the ability to synthesise information, and the ability to act as consultants. However, if our future is based on adding value to data, in a knowledge-based economy, our key asset has to be our people, and developing that asset requires training. The 2017 NewMR Knowledge benchmarking study suggested that too many researchers, globally, were not getting the sort of support they needed to develop their skills. So, Sue York and Ray Poynter have launched a new study in 2018 looking to benchmark training. Once the data is collected we will write and distribute a report on our findings, along with our recommendations. When you have finished the survey you will be asked […]

Image of Survey

Call for Collaboration – Training Benchmark Survey 2018

Updated 2 FebrMarch, 2018 Sue York and Ray Poynter are heading a collaborative effort to learn more about the current state of play with respect to training in the market research and insights industry, with a view to making recommendations for improvements. This study builds on the learning we achieved late last year with our Knowledge Benchmarking study (read more about that study by clicking here). We invite anybody who is interested to join this collaboration, and some of those who have already indicated support are shown below – more will be added when we clarify whether they want publicity or not. What sort of help are we looking for:  Suggesting improvements to the questionnaire. [Completed]  Helping translate the questionnaire. We already have some offers of help – but we would like more languages and more help. Helping maximise the response to the survey. We want to ensure that we get a large enough sample so that we can analyse the results by country, by role (e.g. client-side versus agency), and by years in the industry. Helping with the open-ended responses (especially those not in English). Help with reviewing the analysis, recommendations and commentary. Timeline The timeline is subject to collective […]

Things you need to know 1

To lose one may be regarded as a misfortune, to lose two looks like carelessness!

‘To lose one may be regarded as a misfortune, to lose two looks like carelessness.’ From time to time, you will hear this useful phrase. Here are some notes about what it means, where it comes from, and key facts about Oscar Wilde (the originator of the phrase). Where does it come from? The original quote comes from a play, ‘The Importance of Being Earnest’, written by Irish poet, author and playwright Oscar Wilde (1854 – 1900). The quote in the play is spoken by Lady Bracknell, “‘To lose one parent, Mr Worthing, may be regarded as a misfortune; to lose both looks like carelessness.” What does it mean? The statement implies there is something wrong with the person being spoken about. For example, ‘To lose one CFO is unlucky, to lose two looks like a pattern.’ The device shifts the focus away from the event (for example a CFO leaving) and moves it to the person being ‘judged’. The tone of the comment sounds humorous, but the intent is quite sharp. The speaker is saying there is probably something deficient with the person/company being spoken about. The term is similar to ‘There is no smoke without fire.’, but it […]

Ray Poynter on stage

Ray Poynter’s presentation at JMRA Annual Conference 2017

This week, Ray Poynter was the opening keynote speaker at the JMRA (Japanese Market Research Association) Annual Conference in Tokyo. Ray’s topic was ‘Where next, and how do we get there?’ The four final points, the big picture, that Ray left the audience with were: Traditional Research is yesterday New methods are the future A dichotomy is emerging Data / DIY / Automation / AI Consultancy and Storytelling The tide of change is mostly English The key priorities for clients are usually in the following order: Speed Cost Agile Quality If you would like to download a copy of Ray’s presentation click here.

Picture of a bridge in Lisbon

Major update on mobile market research

For a few years there have been relatively few new findings about mobile market research. We have seen the share of online surveys completed via mobile increasing and we have seen the number of mobile only studies (studies that require a smartphone, for example location-based, in-the-moment and smartphone ethnography) increasing. But the overall picture has remained fairly constant in terms of advice and practice. However, the picture has now changed. Last week saw five days of short courses and presentations in Lisbon, Portugal at the ESRA Conference (European Survey Research Association). There were over 700 presentations and most of the leading names in survey, web, and mobile research were present (including: Don Dillman, Mick Couper, Google’s Mario Callegaro, SurveyMonkey’s Sarah Cho, Edith de Leeuw, Roger Tourangeau, GfK’s Randall Thomas & Frances Barlas, and my colleague Sue York). There were more than 20 presentations particularly relevant to mobile market research – making it one of the largest collections of reports and findings from experiments reported anywhere. In this post I set out my key takeaways from the ESRA Conference in terms of mobile market research. But, I may update this post when I get access to all of the presentations and […]