Rooster Happy New Year

Asia Pacific Predictions for 2017

The APAC (Asia Pacific) region’s two New Years are relatively close together this year, Western New Year on January 1 and Chinese New Year on January 28. So, this seems like a good moment to ask various people from the region to tell us what they think will be the key issues in APAC in 2017. Here are nine predictions focused on APAC, but embracing the world. Becki Southern Marketing Manager Asia Pacific, Lightspeed, Australia Automation will undeniably present opportunity to keep consumer data and understanding top of mind but, with systems replacing human decision making for marketers, Market Research will need to ensure its relevance and position within the planning process. Focus on creating stronger partnerships with clients will allow researchers to better understand this shift and act accordingly. This will mean acting differently, developing new ways of working and new solutions that fill the gaps for the 2017 marketer. This comes down to having the right technology to add to the consumer data brands already own. Harnessing this to complement strategy and build a deeper understanding is imperative to keep focus on agencies and suppliers outside the realm of their own data. As younger markets in APAC grow, […]

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What can the Asia Pacific Region teach the MR world?

I think some of the best thinking about new market research comes from the Asia Pacific region and I want to share five examples that are helping re-shape the way we envisage and do market research. All five examples will be presented at the upcoming, all virtual, online Festival of NewMR – sharing ideas from Japan, Australia, India and both mainland and Hong Kong China. Shobha Prasad, Drshti Strategic Research Services, India The Fickle Mistress: Loyal consumers changing brands and the change-constancy conflict. Shobha highlights the impact of brand renovation on loyal consumers, and the role of the Change-Constancy Conflict in the loyal consumer’s response to such changes. By analysing multiple cases over the last decade Shobha has determined the stages and allied emotions that the consumer goes through, and has assessed how this plays out across different categories and consumer types. Sign up for our APAC Tuesday 28 February Webinar by clicking here. Mike Sherman, Marketing, Customer Insight & CRM/Big Consumer Data Expert, Hong Kong Big Consumer Data: the Promise, the Overpromise, the Opportunity Mike tackles the main criticism of Big Data, that it is all talk and no action. By looking at Big Data successes and failures Mike […]

Marketing Research or Market Research? A unhelpful distinction

Once again I have heard of somebody claiming that there is a useful difference between the terms marketing research and market research. However, there is not a useful distinction between these two terms. The meaning of words is determined not by experts, universities, or trade bodies, but by usage. We might not always like the consequences of usage, but just like King Canute, we need to acknowledge that we can’t turn back the tide. Four schools of belief Amongst people who believe that market research and marketing research are different there are essentially four camps, all of which have plenty of members. The key point about these four camps is not which is right, the key point is that all four exist, all contain experts and important sources. The four camps are shown in the image below (click on it to enlarge it). Camp A: marketing research is a sub-set of market research These people say all of marketing research is part of market research, but market research also contains many aspects that are not about marketing, for example social research, political research, and usability. Camp B: market research is a sub-set of marketing research. This is the mirror image […]

What is market research?

Market research (or marketing research if you prefer) is what you do when you want to understand customers in order to make better business decisions if there isn’t a faster/cheaper/better way. At first glance that might sound like a slightly amusing aphorism. But, when you consider it a little deeper, it highlights a number of the problems and opportunities that confront market research. Understand customers At its heart, market research is about understanding customers. This includes current customers, past customers, customers of other brands, and potential customers. It means finding out things like: what people want, what people might want, what people would pay for things, how people see the world, and many more customer related questions. It sometimes even means working with customers to create ideas, as well as to evaluate and shape them. Better business decisions Market research draws on academic and social research, but its purpose is to help businesses make better business decisions. An organisation might be a commercial enterprise, a government, or a not for profit organisation, but in each case market research is used to help it make better business decisions, even when the definition of business is contextual. When there isn’t a faster, […]

The differences between academic and commercial research

Posted by Ray Poynter, 1 April 2014 I am currently at an academic conference on mobile research in Cyprus, a WebDataNet event. I am a keynote speaker and my role is to share with the delegates the commercial market research picture. I really enjoy mixing with the academic world, and I am intrigued and fascinated by the differences between the academic and commercial worlds. This post looks at some of the key differences that I have noticed. Timelines In the academic world, timelines are usually longer than in market research. For example, an ethnographic project might be planned for 8 months, in the field for 4 months, and spend 12 months being analysed and written up. A commercial ‘ethnography’ might spend 4 weeks in design and set-up, the fieldwork might be wrapped up in 2 weeks, and the analysis and ‘write up’ conducted in 2 weeks. In many ways the differences in the timelines result from differences in the motivation for doing a research project. Commercial market research is often conducted to answer a specific business question, which means the research has to be conducted within the timeline required by the business question – which is typically rapid. Academic research […]

BRC Customer Insight Conference – London

Today I attended the BRC Consumer Insight Conference in London as was very pleasantly surprised by the quality of the event and the speakers. Here are a few notes I jotted down during the day. Peter Williams, former CEO of Selfridges and board member of ASOS.COM – highlighted some of the fundamental changes in retail, including a long-term move to a smaller retail footprint with lots of consequences for malls, high streets, and especially secondary locations. Rory Sutherland and John Kearon presented overlapping presentations that highlighted the shift in marketing away from the rational to the emotional. At one level this was refreshing, with its emphasis on behavioural economics and psychology, on the other hand it flies in the face of the trend towards the metrics of clicks, likes, and shares. Rory and John also had a few unkind words for economics and market research – a topic I will come back to in another post. Ruth Spencer from Boots, Mike Coshott from B&Q, Caroline Pollard from Debenhams, Alex Chruszcz from ASDA, and Robin Phillips from Waitrose all spoke to different elements of using technology and systems to understand the customer. At the heart of the conversation was a core […]

“most published research findings are probably false” – John Ioannidis

The worlds of academic and commercial research are being riven at the moment with concerns and accusation about how poor much of the research and conclusions that have been published are. This particular problem is not specifically about market research, it covers health research, machine learning, bio-chemistry, neuroscience, and much more. The problem relates to the way that tests are being created and interpreted. One of the key people highlighting the concerns about this problem is John Ioannidis from Stanford University and his work has been reported both in academic and popular forums (for example The Economist). The quote “most published research findings are probably false.” comes from Ioannidis. Key Quotes Here are some of the quotes and worries floating about at the moment: America’s National Institutes of Health (NIH) – researchers would find it hard to reproduce at least three-quarters of all published biomedical findings Sandy Pentland, a computer scientist at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology – three-quarters of published scientific papers in the field of machine learning are bunk because of this “overfitting” John Bohannon, a biologist at Harvard, submitted an error stewm paper on a cancer drug derived from lichen to 350 journals (as an experiment), 157 […]

Does using the #MRX tag limit the conversation?

Most market researchers (IMO) who use Twitter do so with the #MRX tag, with the #NewMR, #ESOMAR and #AMSRS tags a little way behind. Indeed Vaughan Mordecai has recently posted an interesting analysis of #MRX contributor and content – and Jeffrey Henning Tweets a weekly list of top #MRX links and posts a biweekly blog on GreenBook about the top ten. But, is all of this just creating a cozy world where a few thousand market researchers tweet to each other, and nobody else really contributes, reads, are even cares? The quickest way to get recognition amongst market researchers is to use the #MRX tag, so it becomes the default, and in doing so, perhaps, it becomes a fence or boundary of our own making? Time add new links to the wider world? Other leading #MRX figures, such as Tom Ewing and Reg Baker have written about what happens if you ignore the #MRX audience, your figures quickly decline. But perhaps the key is to be adding more dimensions to what we do, and for those dimensions to have an external focus? By external focus, I mean using cues and clues that other people are likely to be looking for. […]

Is market research really a career?

Yesterday, at the BAQMaR Conference, the Fringe Factory launched its study into what young graduates are looking for in an industry and what is their perception of market research. The Fringe Factory surveyed over 1800 graduates across nine countries. The report produced five “eye-catching insights and recommendations”. But for me one of the key points was that only 13% of the young people surveyed said they would consider a job in market research, and only 3% listed it as the best sector. To find out more about the study, the Fringe Factory, and the other insights and recommendation, look at the presentation below. The presentation is hosted via SlideShare – this means you can advance the slides and by click on the four arrows in the bottom right of the presentation window, turn it into a full screen presentation. Is Market Research really a Career? from Fringe Factory The Fringe Factory is supported by ESOMAR. To find out more about the Fringe Factory, visit their website.

Facebook and ‘Mediawashing’, a Threat to Market Research? – Nikki Lavoie

Posted by Nikki Lavoie, Chief Commercial Officer, Sky Consulting, France. We know that research participants sometimes cannot or will not be honest in their responses. We know about behavioral economics. We know all the things to say to encourage open and honest discussions and survey responses. But what about our online and social media-based conversations? I’m a Second Generation Facebook user. By this I mean that I’ve been around on Facebook since almost immediately after it was released to universities in the Greater Boston Area (I’ll refrain from listing the year so you can’t do the math). What started out as a site intended to allow students to evaluate one another’s’ attractiveness has become a global commodity used for connecting, promoting, expressing, sharing, and now for market research. One of the interesting trends that has come up in relation to social media outlets, and Facebook in particular, is something I’m going to call “mediawashing” (you heard it here first, write that word down). Similar to greenwashing, mediawashing is the dissemination of disinformation that a person chooses to put forth, typically about themselves or their lives, using social media. In laymen’s terms: people paint pretty pictures of their lives, but it’s […]