Happy Thinking People

Generation Digital Detox?

Guest post by Edward Appleton, 29 November 2019 Millennials, Gen Z – totally hooked on Social Media, chatting, sharing, smartphone obsessed, with less and less time for the “real world”. True or false? If you have a teenager in the family, you might agree. In our research around the world, we’re beginning to pick up on something different – a growing push back against digital, an awareness of the hold it’s taking, concerns about potential addiction. We wanted to understand this emerging sense of “digital discomfort” better so carried out our own studying, exploring with young folk in India, UK and Germany. The results are fascinating reading – one participant talked for example about digital getting in the way of being in touch with the immediate surroundings, in this case nature: “….I definitely feel my brain is much happier when I’m looking at the leaves on the trees rather than FB” Another enthused about a de-digitalized nightclub scene in Berlin: “I love the smartphone-ban in Berlin nightclubs. You engage with the people around you. In the UK it’s often just people doing Insta stories left, right and centre … it’s annoying but it’s actually quite sad” Interested? The report touches […]

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We Love Starting a Conversation

Post by Sue York, 27 January, 2018 At NewMR we love starting a research conversation – that’s one of our main reasons for being – to encourage researchers to think and talk about research and how to move our methods, approaches and practices forward to better embrace the future. So I was delighted to see this follow up to our November New, But Not Tech! event (click here if you would like to listen to the presentation that sparked this follow up conversation or the rest of the event). What started the conversation? In our New! But Not Tech event Sue Bell was interviewed by Suzanne Burdon on “Sense-making – a challenge to behavioural insights” (click here to listen to the recording) and in the Q & A session following the presentation a question was asked – Is sense making an ethnographic technique? Sue and Charlie Cochrane continued their conversation on this after the event and Sue has kindly summarised the exchange on her blog http://www.sbresearch.com.au/index.php/bellbird/139-revisiting-ethnography-a-conversation-between-sue-bell-and-charlie-cochrane Thanks for sharing Sue and Charlie!

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How does your knowledge and MR learning compare with others?

Update, the survey is now closed and the analysis has begun. When we have finished the analysis, reporting and story creation we will update this page and tell you how to get a copy of the final report and provide a link to a short form of the report. You can still see the topline result from the data collection below. We (Ray Poynter and Sue York) are running a study that seeks to benchmark the current state of play in terms of what research terms are understood. Once the data is collected we will be analyzing the data and creating a report, looking at the key issues identified by the research, and making suggestions for career and professional development. Before looking at the data results so far, please take part in the survey by clicking here [survey now closed]. The survey comprises: 9 terms used in market research, asking participants which are they familiar with (as in could explain to somebody). A series of questions asking how often people do things like attend conferences, listen to webinars, take part in training, and read articles and books. There are just two demographics, age and country. A question about topics you would […]

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New Participants, New Expectations, for Qualitative Market Research

The post below is a guest post from Maya Middlemiss, Founder and Managing Director of Saros Research, based in their UK office. Qualitative research has been around for many decades now, and despite the growing plethora of online tools, many techniques have more than stood the test of time: Amidst all the emergent research activities for which we recruit, the good old group discussions and depth interviews are still amongst the most widely used. Of course, the subject matter being discussed may have changed, and the qualitative enquiry techniques employed by the researchers continue to evolve, but the basic formats continue to work well – in skilful hands yielding valuable insights to business challenges old and new. What about the people taking part though? We’d contend that they have changed significantly, in contrast to the methodologies. A couple of decades ago, recruitment took place by word of mouth or lists in telephone call centres – slightly differently in different markets, but it was highly restricted. Certainly in the UK, being a ‘focus group participant’ meant that you were personally known to one or more recruiters… And as such it was highly likely that such a person got used far more often than […]

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Politicised discourse – is Market Research Attuned?

The post below is a guest post from Edward Appleton, Director Global Marketing at Happy Thinking People, based in their Berlin office. We live in unsettled times – Brexit, Trump, opinions polarising and splintering… more and more aspects of life seem to becoming politicised. Whether it’s fake news, cultural appropriation, safe zones – public discourse is often charged, filtered. This “politicisation” – oblique or direct – is happening faster than we think and is pretty pervasive. Some examples: US retailer Nordstrom became part of a storm following its decision to de-stock Ivanka Trump’s fashion line The Budweiser 2017 Super Bowl TV ad sparked a wave of protest following what was perceived as a politicised, pro-immigration message. Consider what the use of capital letters on Twitter can easily suggest. Are we ready for this in market research? The filter bubble is a familiar concept in social media, but what about the interaction that goes on in a Market Research Online Community? Or a mobile chat? Groups? Do we capture authentically how peer-to-peer communication really happens – or are we “shut out” as external observers? The hypothesis is that people become more inhibited in expressing their true views, with multiple social pressures encouraging […]

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What can the Asia Pacific Region teach the MR world?

I think some of the best thinking about new market research comes from the Asia Pacific region and I want to share five examples that are helping re-shape the way we envisage and do market research. All five examples will be presented at the upcoming, all virtual, online Festival of NewMR – sharing ideas from Japan, Australia, India and both mainland and Hong Kong China. Shobha Prasad, Drshti Strategic Research Services, India The Fickle Mistress: Loyal consumers changing brands and the change-constancy conflict. Shobha highlights the impact of brand renovation on loyal consumers, and the role of the Change-Constancy Conflict in the loyal consumer’s response to such changes. By analysing multiple cases over the last decade Shobha has determined the stages and allied emotions that the consumer goes through, and has assessed how this plays out across different categories and consumer types. Sign up for our APAC Tuesday 28 February Webinar by clicking here. Mike Sherman, Marketing, Customer Insight & CRM/Big Consumer Data Expert, Hong Kong Big Consumer Data: the Promise, the Overpromise, the Opportunity Mike tackles the main criticism of Big Data, that it is all talk and no action. By looking at Big Data successes and failures Mike […]