ESOMAR report confirms that surveys are in decline

Last week I posted an article looking at the decline in survey research, which included some data from ESOMAR and some predictions. This week, ESOMAR posted the latest Global Market Research Report and it includes some interesting figures on data collection modes. Figures which are broadly in line with my predictions. The table below is mostly a repeat of the one I included in my previous post. It shows the data from the ESOMAR reports for 2007, 2010, and 2013, along with my forecasts for 2016 and 2019. In this version, I have added the data from the 2014 ESOMAR Global Market Research report at the bottom. Note, the ESOMAR data refer to the final figures for the previous year, so the 2014 report is based on the completed returns for the whole of 2013. The decline in research spending on projects where the data was collected via surveys, from 53% in the 2013 report to 48% in 2014, is a very large drop and is even faster than implied by my predictions. The ESOMAR Pricing Study would suggest that some of the drop is due to falling costs for online research and a continued switch to online from face-to-face […]

What are the top ten questions for Opinion Polling?

A new edition ESOMAR’s Answers to Contemporary Questions book is being produced, with three new chapters, International, Mobile, and Opinion Polling. This post is a shout out to crowd source the key questions for Opinion Polling. What do you think about? What do market researchers mean by an Opinion Poll? Who uses Opinion Polls? What other types of polls are there? What are the key requirements of an Opinion Poll? Why might two Opinion Polls sometimes give different results? Why do Opinion Polls sometimes cause public outcries? What information needs to be published with Opinion Poll results? Must all Opinion Polls be published? My client wishes to publish a statement which is not supported by the findings of the Opinion Poll, what do I do? How can I find out more about Opinion Polls? One of the things the chapter needs to do is to draw a distinction between something conducted according to the guidelines of the key associations, and the ‘voodoo polls’ that are popular on websites in the media.  

Is market research really a career?

Yesterday, at the BAQMaR Conference, the Fringe Factory launched its study into what young graduates are looking for in an industry and what is their perception of market research. The Fringe Factory surveyed over 1800 graduates across nine countries. The report produced five “eye-catching insights and recommendations”. But for me one of the key points was that only 13% of the young people surveyed said they would consider a job in market research, and only 3% listed it as the best sector. To find out more about the study, the Fringe Factory, and the other insights and recommendation, look at the presentation below. The presentation is hosted via SlideShare – this means you can advance the slides and by click on the four arrows in the bottom right of the presentation window, turn it into a full screen presentation. Is Market Research really a Career? from Fringe Factory The Fringe Factory is supported by ESOMAR. To find out more about the Fringe Factory, visit their website.

Answers to Frequently Asked Mobile Market Research Questions

In collaboration with other authors we have produced an initial draft of the chapter on Mobile Market Research, for the ESOMAR book Answers to Contemporary Market Research Questions, and we are seeking feedback. The video below shows Sue York’s presentation at the recent NewMR Training Day and you can download a PDF of the current draft. Remember, the Contemporary Answers book is intended for people new to research or new to a topic – it is not supposed to be the definitive or comprehensive answer. We have already received some feedback (following the Training Day), but we’d love to hear more. So, please add your comments to this post using the comments facility. The mobile chapter, along with new chapters on International Research and Polling will be added in 2014.  

What are the key international research questions?

In 2013, ESOMAR published Answers to Contemporary Market Research Questions. A book which seeks to answer the questions that somebody new to a topic would often like to ask, but may be too embarrassed to ask. The book can be purchased from the ESOMAR website here. In 2014, new chapters are being added to the book, and one of the new chapters will be international market research. At this stage we are identifying the ten (approximately ten) questions that the chapter should answer. Below are our initial thoughts. What is meant by international research? Can the same questionnaire be used in every country? Can I use the same data collection method in every country? Can I use English in every country if there are ‘enough’ English speakers? How is multi-country research commissioned and organised? How is international qualitative research conducted? Does market research cost the same in each country? What are the differences in laws and ethics around the world? What are the key challenges in analysing international data? ? We would welcome your suggestions, for changes, additions, or deletions? We are also consulting on questions for a chapter on mobile market research, you can see the current suggestions here.

What are the key mobile market research questions?

In 2013, ESOMAR published Answers to Contemporary Market Research Questions. A book which seeks to answer the questions that somebody new to a topic would often like to ask, but may be too embarrassed to ask. The book can be purchased from the ESOMAR website here. In 2014, new chapters are being added to the book, and one of the new chapters will be mobile market research. At this stage we are identifying the ten (approximately ten) questions that the chapter should answer. Below are our initial thoughts. Can I assume that my research can be conducted entirely via smartphones? What are feature phones and how are they used in mobile research? When should I use mobile only and when should I use mixed-mode research? What is a research app and when are they used? What is passive data collection? Does mobile research give the same answers as online research? What are the key uses of mobile in qualitative research? How is geolocation being used in mobile research? What are the key legal and ethical issues for mobile research? ? We would welcome your suggestions, for changes, additions, or deletions?

10 Reasons to buy ESOMAR’s new book

1 It’s not your classic textbook This book focusses on the questions that are part of the everyday practicalities of market research, the advice you don’t typically get from a textbook – the type of advice researchers would ideally have a mentor or more experienced colleague to ask – unfortunately not everyone has these support networks. 2 The contributors are practitioners The content has been prepared by a team of experienced researchers, so the advice is relevant for researchers who are talking to clients, writing proposals, managing projects, developing questionnaires, analysing data, reporting results, etc. 3 A great resource for the generalist or research all-rounder (Thanks to Sue Bell for emphasising this point.) Many conferences and events, social media forums, and journals focus on specialist areas. This book, doesn’t cover everything, but aims to give a solid grounding on the basics, written and reviewed by experienced market and social research industry heavy weights who know what you need to know. 4 A balance between traditional and new techniques The book covers the traditional areas – questionnaire design, qualitative, pricing research, B2B – as well as the emerging techniques, for example, communities and social media research. 5 A variety of views […]